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Malibu Lagoon Field Trips: Sunday, 26 February, 8:30 & 10am.

February 23, 2017
Artist's perspective of west channels view from SW corner (RestoreMalibuLagoon . com)

Artists 2012 perspective of finished project
(RestoreMalibuLagoon . com)

Lagoon looking east - compare to Artist's Perspective (R. Ehler 7/27/14)

Channel & Lagoon looking east July 2014
(Randy Ehler )

Still more birds than you can shake a stick at. What can I say? Birds you’ve never dreamed of! Garbled Modwit, Club-sandwich Tern, Faque’s Tourniquet,  Delicious Gull, Fraculated Wiglet, Desert Cormorant, Insignificant Sandpiper, Plaid Oysterroaster, Western Roof-Owl, maybe 65 other species. A quiet beach on a quiet day. Who can complain about that? Dress in layers.

Most of January’s birds will still be with us, including: up to 22 species of passerines, 12 species of gulls & terns, 11 ducks, 8 sandpipers, 4 grebes, 4 herons & egrets, 4 raptors, 4 plovers, 3 loons, 3 doves, 3 cormorants, 2 hummingbirds and the inevitable partridge in a pear tree.  Come and meet them all.

Adult Walk 8:30 a.m. – Beginner and experienced, 2-3 hours.  Species range from 40 in June to 60-75 during migrations and winter.  We meet at the metal-shaded viewing area (see photo below) next to the parking lot and begin walking east towards the lagoon.  We always check the offshore rocks and the ocean.  When lagoon outlet is closed we continue east around the lagoon to Adamson House.  We put out special effort to make our monthly Malibu Lagoon walks attractive to first-time and beginning birdwatchers.  So please, if you are at all worried about coming on a trip and embarrassing yourself because of all the experts, we remember our first trips too.  Someone showed us the birds; now it’s our turn.

Meeting place - What's that animal in the foreground? See photo below of him heading the other way. (Santa Monica Bay Restoration Foundation 6/18/13)

Meeting place – Hey, what’s that animal in the foreground?
See him heading the other way in photo below.
(Santa Monica Bay Restoration Foundation 6-18-13)

Children and Parents Walk 10:00 a.m.   One hour session, meeting at the metal-shaded viewing area (see photo above) between parking lot and channel.  We start at 10:00 for a shorter walk and to allow time for families to get it together on a sleepy Sunday morning.  Our leaders are experienced with kids so please bring them to the beach!  We have an ample supply of binoculars that children can use without striking terror into their parents.  We want to see families enjoying nature. (If you have a Scout Troop or other group of more than seven people, you must call Lu (310-395-6235) to make sure we have enough binoculars and docents.)

Map to Meeting Place
Directions: Malibu Lagoon is at the intersection of Pacific Coast Highway and Cross Creek Road, west of Malibu Pier and the bridge.  Look around for people wearing binoculars.
Parking: Parking machine recently installed in the lagoon lot: 1 hr $3; 2 hrs $6; 3 hrs $9, all day $12 ($11 seniors); credit cards accepted. Annual passes accepted. You may also park (read the signs carefully) either along PCH west of Cross Creek Road, on Cross Creek Road, or on Civic Center Way north (inland) of the shopping center.  Lagoon parking in shopping center lots is not permitted.

Prior checklists:
2016:   Jan-June,   July-Dec          2015:    Jan-May,    July-Dec
2014:   Jan-July,    July-Dec          2013:   Jan-June,   July-Dec
2012:   Jan-June,   July -Dec         2011:   Jan-June,   July-Dec
2010:  Jan-June,   July-Dec           2009:  Jan-June,   July-Dec.
[Chuck Almdale]

Locally known as 'Willie the Weasel' (Cal. State Parks 6/18/13)

Locally known as ‘Son of Willie the Weasel’
(Cal. State Parks 6-18-13)

Why Don’t Woodpeckers Get Concussions? | PBS Science Video

February 21, 2017
by

More head-banging news from the land of hard knocks.

This is an installment of the PBS – It’s OK to be Smart series. If no film or link appears in this email, go to the blog to view it by clicking on the blog title above. If the film stops & starts in an annoying manner, press pause (lower left double bars ||) to let it buffer and get ahead of you.  [Chuck Almdale]

Great Backyard Bird Count Video

February 17, 2017

Don’t forget the GBBC starts today, Friday, Feb. 17, 2017

Here’s a short video you can watch to whet your appetite.

GBBC Video

Similar to Project FeederWatch, the Great Backyard Bird Count (GBBC) helps scientists learn about the distribution and abundance of birds. But the GBBC works a little differently and takes place over only four days—from February 17 through 20, 2017.

For the GBBC, you count the number of individuals of each species you see during a single counting session, and you submit a checklist for each counting session (not a two-day tally like you do for FeederWatch). You can count in more than one location—just submit a separate checklist for each location each time you count. You can report the same birds to GBBC that you are reporting to Project FeederWatch as well as any other birds you see, even those birds flying overhead that don’t count for FeederWatch.

With the El Niño weather phenomenon warming Pacific waters to temperatures matching the highest ever recorded, participants in the 2017 GBBC may be in for a few surprises. Information gathered and reported online at birdcount.org will help scientists track changes in bird distribution, some of which may be traced to El Niño storms and unusual weather patterns.
[Chuck Almdale]

These Crazy Cute Baby Turtles Want Their Lake Back | Deep Look Video

February 17, 2017
tags:
by

Turtles grow up without parents, which might sound lonely. But for threatened baby turtles raised in a zoo it’s an advantage: they can learn to catch crickets all by themselves. There’s a paradox, though. When they are ready to leave the nursery, there is little wilderness where they can make a home.

This is another installment of the PBS Deep Look series. If no film or link appears in this email, go to the blog to view it by clicking on the blog title above. If the film stops & starts in an annoying manner, press pause (lower left double bars ||) to let it buffer and get ahead of you.  [Chuck Almdale]

Great Backyard Bird Count starts Friday, Feb. 17, 2017

February 15, 2017

Count birds for the Great Backyard Bird Count

Andy Byerly, Tucson AZ Cornell GBBC 2015 photos)

Gambel’s Quail couple
(Andy Byerly, Tucson AZ – Cornell GBBC 2016 photos)

Similar to Project FeederWatch, the Great Backyard Bird Count (GBBC) helps scientists learn about the distribution and abundance of birds. But the GBBC works a little differently and takes place over only four days—from February 17 through 20, 2017.

For the GBBC, you count the number of individuals of each species you see during a single counting session, and you submit a checklist for each counting session (not a two-day tally like you do for FeederWatch). You can count in more than one location—just submit a separate checklist for each location each time you count. You can report the same birds to GBBC that you are reporting to Project FeederWatch as well as any other birds you see, even those birds flying overhead that don’t count for FeederWatch.

With the El Niño weather phenomenon warming Pacific waters to temperatures matching the highest ever recorded, participants in the 2017 GBBC may be in for a few surprises. Information gathered and reported online at birdcount.org will help scientists track changes in bird distribution, some of which may be traced to El Niño storms and unusual weather patterns.

Though rarities and out-of-range species are exciting, it’s important to keep track of more common birds, too. Many species around the world are in steep decline and tracking changes in distribution and numbers over time is vital to determine if conservation measures are needed. Everyone can play a role.

Learn more about how to take part in the Great Backyard Bird Count at birdcount.org. The GBBC is a joint project of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the National Audubon Society with partner Bird Studies Canada and is made possible in part by sponsor Wild Birds Unlimited.

Project FeederWatch is a joint project of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and Bird Studies Canada.

The Cornell Lab of Ornithology is a nonprofit organization supported by friends and members. Our mission is to interpret and conserve the earth’s biological diversity through research, education, and citizen science focused on birds.

Bird Studies Canada is our country’s leading national charitable organization dedicated to bird research and conservation. Our mission is to conserve wild birds of Canada through sound sicience, on-the-ground actions, innovative partnerships, public engagement, and science based advocacy.

 

 

[Posted by Chuck “Rip ‘n’ Read” Almdale]

 

 

 

Project FeederWatch Contact Information

For U.S. participants:
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
Project FeederWatch
159 Sapsucker Woods Rd.,
Ithaca, NY 14850
(607) 254-2427
feederwatch@cornell.edu
http://www.FeederWatch.org

For Canadian participants:
Bird Studies Canada/Etudes d’Oiseaux Canada
cornell.us2.list-manage.com/track/click

P.O. Box 160,
Port Rowan, ON N0E 1M0
(519) 586-3531
pfw@birdscanada.org
Toll Free: 1-888-448-BIRD (2473)
www.birdscanada.org/pfw

 

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