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Great Backyard Bird Count Feb. 18-18, 2019

February 14, 2019

A message from the friendly folks at Project Feeder Watch.
The Great Backyard Bird Count is upon us: February 15-18, 2019!

 

 

FeederWatchers: take part in the Great Backyard Bird Count! Email not displaying correctly?
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Project FeederWatch eNews

February 14, 2019

Count birds for the Great Backyard Bird Count

Similar to Project FeederWatch, the Great Backyard Bird Count (GBBC) helps scientists learn about the distribution and abundance of birds. But the GBBC works a little differently and takes place over four days only—from February 15 through 18.

For the GBBC, you count the number of individuals of each species you see during a single counting session, and you submit a checklist for each counting session (not a two-day tally like you do for FeederWatch). You can count in more than one location—just submit a separate checklist for each location each time you count. You can report the same birds to GBBC that you are reporting to Project FeederWatch as well as any other birds you see, even those birds flying overhead that don’t count for FeederWatch.

This year’s counts are more likely to include sightings of winter finches and grosbeaks that are moving farther south than usual in what’s called an “irruption.” This type of movement is often sparked by poor cone, seed, and berry crops in parts of Canada. “This year is a very exciting one for backyard birders in the East, headlined by the largest Evening Grosbeak movement in at least two decades,” says the Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s Marshall Iliff, a leader of the eBird program.

During the 2018 count, bird watchers from more than 100 countries submitted more than 180,000 bird checklists reporting a record 6,456 species–more than half the known bird species in the world. “With the finch irruption this year, we’re hoping for record bird numbers and another record-breaking year for Canadian participation,” says Jon McCracken, Bird Studies Canada’s National Program Director. “In search of a bit of relief from our cold winters, many Canadians become ‘snow birds’ at this time of year, and spend a bit of time birding somewhere warm. While I always strongly encourage counts in our own snowy Canadian backyards, don’t forget that you can participate anywhere in the world. Last year, I did my count in Florida’s Corkscrew Swamp, and had a fantastic day.”

Learn more about how to take part in the Great Backyard Bird Count at birdcount.org. The GBBC is a joint project of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the National Audubon Society with partner Bird Studies Canada and is made possible in part by founding sponsor Wild Birds Unlimited.

Project FeederWatch is a joint project of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and Bird Studies Canada. Project FeederWatch is sponsored in the U.S. and Canada by Wild Birds Unlimited and in Canada by Armstrong Bird Food.

The Cornell Lab of Ornithology is a nonprofit organization supported by friends and members. Our mission is to interpret and conserve the earth’s biological diversity through research, education, and citizen science focused on birds.

Bird Studies Canada is our country’s leading national charitable organization dedicated to bird research and conservation. Our mission is to conserve wild birds of Canada through sound science, on-the-ground actions, innovative partnerships, public engagement, and science based advocacy.

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Project FeederWatch Contact Information

For U.S. participants:
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
Project FeederWatch
159 Sapsucker Woods Rd.,
Ithaca, NY 14850
(607) 254-2427
feederwatch@cornell.edu
https://feederwatch.org

For Canadian participants:
Bird Studies Canada/Etudes d’Oiseaux Canada
P.O. Box 160,
Port Rowan, ON N0E 1M0
(519) 586-3531
pfw@birdscanada.org
Toll Free: 1-888-448-BIRD (2473)
www.birdscanada.org/pfw

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